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knowledge

Interview with Preeti Zalavadia

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Interview with Preeti Zalavadia

"There is not one story that I have to share. People that I have crossed paths with have inspired to keep me going and walk alongside with them to teach and share. Starting from Dada Ji’s genius, passion and perseverance..."

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Youth Voices: Interview with Vanita Mundhra

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Youth Voices: Interview with Vanita Mundhra

Youth Voices Interview: At CDI we believe in the power of the youth.  They are the future and there is much they can teach us.  Keep on the look out for more from Youth Voices--amplifying the voice of youth.

Vanita will be performing her graduating Chitresh Das Youth Company solo after eight years of study, most intensively under Pandit Chitresh Das and Charlotte Moraga.  In this interview she talks about her beloved Dadaji (Pandit Chitresh Das) and gives some insight on her journey of learning the North Indian classical kathak tradition and the philosophy and teachings of Pandit Chitresh Das. 

Question: When do you first remember thinking that this dance was really something you wanted to pour your heart and soul into?

Vanita: I remember when I was taking classes at the Sacramento branch, there was a really cool step I learned with Dadaji. Unfortunately I don’t remember the exact step but I remember Dadaji giving us pep talks and telling us to be stronger.

What is the thing you're most scared about?

Vanita: Losing my culture and heritage if I do not practice it.

What is the thing you're most excited about with your solo?

Vanita: To show how hard I have been working for the past 8 years and how I integrated all of what what I have learned. My inspiration came when I saw Dadaji perform “India Jazz Suites” and I thought, "Can someone really do so many chhakars (pirouettes) at once, on stage, in front of hundreds of people and not get nervous?"  Then I saw Sonali Didi's performance where I talked to Dadaji backstage.  He told me, "If you lillyputs want to do this kind of solo, then you have to keep practicing, and I know you can do it." 

What do you think people should know about what it's like to prepare for this solo performance?

Vanita: It is a lot of work but if you have had a constant reyaz or practice, then you just have to make it unique.  You have to constantly practice everyday, you have to research, you have to know what you are doing and be able to explain anything if anyone asks.

What is next for you with your dance?

Vanita: I would like to take classes other art forms and possibly perform with them. Additionally, I will take any opportunity to perform in the community. And lastly I would like to eventually start my own classes for kathak.

What are a few things you want people to come away from your solo performance with?

Vanita: (a) To appreciate the arts and to keep them alive by going to see more performances like these;  (b) To understand Dadaji’s tradition, innovations, and hard work he did with all his students.

What message would you want to send to Dadaji and to Charlotte Di?

Vanita: To Dadaji: I do wish he was here, but I am mostly grateful for all the memories he shared with me. The best part was being from Sacramento and coming all the way to the Bay Area for classes because I gained stories that many others did not. But I do remember getting his blessings and I have always remembered his teachings.

To Charlotte Didi: Thank you for giving me this opportunity to do a solo and taking your time out of the day to correct all my mistakes no matter how many times I made them. Thank you for believing in me and teaching me for the past 5 years.

You can witness this next generation kathaka, Vanita Mundhra, perform this Friday, June 23rd at 8pm at the Oshman Family JCC, Cultural Arts Hall in Palo Alto.  She will be accompanied by accomplished musicians: Ben Kunin on sarode, Samrat Kakkeri on tabla and her guru sisters, Kritika Sharma on manjira, Atmika Sarukkai on bansuri and Ishani Chakrabarti on harmonium.  Tickets are available here

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Interview with Asavari Ukidve

Interview with Asavari Ukidve

Interview with Chitresh Das Institute Teacher Asavari Ukidve

June 6, 2017

Asavari Ukidve started her training in 1999 in Union City branch and has been studying now for over 17 years under the guidance of Pandit Chitresh Das.  Asavari started teaching at Pandit Das’ institution in 2012, at the same time her daughter started learning kathak.  She has primarily taught at the Cupertino location, though she has assisted at other locations.  Asavari’s focus has in teaching kathak has been on imparting kathak knowledge to children and adults alike.  Asavari has participated in multiple school show productions and in community performances.

Question: Tell us what you love about teaching kathak?

Asavari: I have learnt Kathak from the age of 7 years myself, first in India for about 10 years and then with Dadaji for about 15 years till his passing. I can truly say that it has been one single thing that given me immense joy and exhilaration whether dancing or teaching. Seeing that “Aha” expression on little girls faces, when they understand a concept or a composition that I am trying to explain to them or the joy they feel on getting something right  after trying a few times is a feeling of happiness & accomplishment for me. The thing I love the most about teaching Kathak however is helping moms (like me) understand and realize their hidden potential/passion and helping them make the best of that during the 1 hour they take out of their busy life with kids/work/husbands. Every single one of my adult students who is a mom is there because they want to be there(unlike some kids :-) ) they are all self motivated, eager to learn and put in whatever it takes for them to keep improving or mastering something they have learnt. Helping them channel in their potential and passion is truly rewarding.

Question: What did you learn from Pandit Chitresh Das that most impacts your teaching?

Asavari: Greatest learning from Dadaji? Wow ! There are so many, kinda hard to pick one. But here is the one that made a lasting impact.  Dadaji always said Mother is the first Guru, and what stays with me after listening to him speak about his philosophies and view many, many times, is the fact, that as a Mother, it is a huge responsibility for me to keep up my training (in dance and every other aspect of life).  If you can’t take care of yourselves, you can’t take care of your family. If you can’t stand up for yourselves no one else will. Those are his teachings that are deep rooted in my heart.  Quite often I find myself repeating Dadaji’s teachings certainly to all the moms in my class, but also to the little girls to help them grow up to be self-reliant, responsible, empowered women.

Question: What is the most challenging thing about dancing kathak?  

Asavari: I think the most challenging aspect of kathak is to continue to develop and refine your skill over all elements of tayyari, laykari, khoobsurati, nazaakat, and Abhinaya. While demonstrating abhinaya requires you to channel in your inner ability to portray various feelings, a solid 16-gun or chakkars require immense riyaaz and mehnat. And of course Kathak Yoga. I will be forever thankful to Dadaji for introducing this beautiful concept that challenges you to truly focus and bring your mind and body together.

Question: What is the most surprising thing you think people may not know about teaching kathak?

Asavari: I think one thing I did not realize before I started teaching and others may not know as well is that I find my own dance improved immensely after I started teaching. As you teach others, it forces you to solidify and refine your own skills. I now realize why Dadaji always referred to himself as modern guru in training. Every question asked by a student forces you to delve deeper into your own understanding of the dance.

Question: Can you tell us a story about something that continues to inspire you to teach?

Asavari: What continues to inspire me to teach (and why I started in the first place) is not necessarily a particular incident or a story as such. The inspiration comes more from observing Dadaji teach our class over the years. His ability to connect with every single student on personal level, understand their strengths and shortcomings & inspire them to push themselves beyond their potential was baffling. Even in a class of 20+ students there was no place you could hide from him. It was eerie that he could spot your mistakes sometimes even without looking at you. However this is what inspired all of us to push ourselves to the next level. This is what continues to inspire me to teach students and If I can help them push their boundaries and realize their potential, I will feel I have played a small part in helping continue Dadaji’s legacy and teachings.

Question: What do you look forward to in the near future with the Chitresh Das Institute?

Asavari: As a teacher at CDI, my goal is to impart to little girls and adults alike the knowledge I have gained over the years on various aspects of not only kathak but also how it ties in with Indian heritage, culture and history. Personally I believe that the Indian Diaspora in South Bay has been hugely deprived of having access to a viable and authentic Kathak School. I look forward to and am glad to be spreading Dadaji’s teaching to this huge pool of Indians who are eager to have themselves/their children learn this art form.  I look forward to expanding my own performance repertoire through community events and other opportunities. I also hope I can help my students share their own learning with others.